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Overheard in product: Beginners, product-market fit, simple solutions, CSS, and breakfast

We've been eavesdropping. Find out what product folks were buzzing about on social and Slack last week.
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We’re back with part 20 of Overheard in Product—a series where we round up all of the tantalizing conversations from product folks that you may have missed on the web last week.

This week, we overheard the importance of being a beginner, product-market fit, simple solutions, CSS struggles, and breakfast food.

Let’s get to it.

Beginner’s luck

Ali Spittel, software engineer at DEV, reminded us to keep a beginner mindset throughout life.

this is a screenshot image of a tweet from ali spittel that reads: always be a beginner at something

Food for thought: When’s the last time you started learning something from scratch?

Fitness goals

Brian Norgard, former CPO at Tinder, warned against blindly building features.

this is a tweet from brian norgard that reads: a lack of more product-market-fit is never solved with more features

Here’s our breakdown on how to achieve product-market fit.

Simple plan

Coach and author Brad Stulberg championed folks who make things simpler rather than more complex.

this is a tweet from brad stulberg that says: be wary of serial complexifiers. simple is a good principle, simple usually works, simple doesn't mean easy

And he was in good company. Sahil Lavingia applied the same idea to everything from writing to coding—urging folks to, “Figure out what 𝘪𝘵 is, and then get rid of what isn't 𝘪𝘵.”

Well, sheet

Designer and developer Daryl Ginn got a little tripped up with everyone’s favorite stylesheet language.

this is a tweet from daryl ginn about frustrations with css

By the look of the replies, this hit home with many folks.

Bonus: Cereal-ously interesting

America’s idea of what proper “breakfast food” is apparently a lot narrower than we realize. So where did our stringent ideas of breakfast come from?

This article in The Atlantic investigates the origins of "the most important meal of the day".

Author's picture
Margaret Kelsey
Director of Marketing at OpenView
Margaret Kelsey is the Director of Marketing at OpenView. Before OpenView, she made immeasurable contributions to Appcues' marketing programs as the Director of Brand and Creative. She’s a big fan of puns, Blackbird Donuts, and Oxford commas—probably in that order.
Skip to section:

Skip to section:

We’re back with part 20 of Overheard in Product—a series where we round up all of the tantalizing conversations from product folks that you may have missed on the web last week.

This week, we overheard the importance of being a beginner, product-market fit, simple solutions, CSS struggles, and breakfast food.

Let’s get to it.

Beginner’s luck

Ali Spittel, software engineer at DEV, reminded us to keep a beginner mindset throughout life.

this is a screenshot image of a tweet from ali spittel that reads: always be a beginner at something

Food for thought: When’s the last time you started learning something from scratch?

Fitness goals

Brian Norgard, former CPO at Tinder, warned against blindly building features.

this is a tweet from brian norgard that reads: a lack of more product-market-fit is never solved with more features

Here’s our breakdown on how to achieve product-market fit.

Simple plan

Coach and author Brad Stulberg championed folks who make things simpler rather than more complex.

this is a tweet from brad stulberg that says: be wary of serial complexifiers. simple is a good principle, simple usually works, simple doesn't mean easy

And he was in good company. Sahil Lavingia applied the same idea to everything from writing to coding—urging folks to, “Figure out what 𝘪𝘵 is, and then get rid of what isn't 𝘪𝘵.”

Well, sheet

Designer and developer Daryl Ginn got a little tripped up with everyone’s favorite stylesheet language.

this is a tweet from daryl ginn about frustrations with css

By the look of the replies, this hit home with many folks.

Bonus: Cereal-ously interesting

America’s idea of what proper “breakfast food” is apparently a lot narrower than we realize. So where did our stringent ideas of breakfast come from?

This article in The Atlantic investigates the origins of "the most important meal of the day".

Author's picture
Margaret Kelsey
Director of Marketing at OpenView
Margaret Kelsey is the Director of Marketing at OpenView. Before OpenView, she made immeasurable contributions to Appcues' marketing programs as the Director of Brand and Creative. She’s a big fan of puns, Blackbird Donuts, and Oxford commas—probably in that order.
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